More Plays More Exposure With Help of Java Technology

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January 24, 2014
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Music has always inspired man and many of people are blessed with the ability to create and rejoice masses.  The effective Java powered promotion system and pure art has made humanity entertained from the time life has started. Now with the availability of internet and ultimately the social media everything has become global and everyone living in any part of the world can hear what you create.

There are ranking allotted at Sound Cloud and they are reached with the high number of plays and followers at Sound Cloud gottent with help of Java Technolog. When an artist is followed or he gets his tracks played then it’s the sign that he has got the fans. Global exposure is extremely associated with no. of fans you get. Simply uploading the track can’t get you anyway until and unless you get the followers and plays for your tracks. One of the simplest ways to get them without any effort is through buying SoundCloud followers. They are cheap and can easily be purchased by anyone here: http://soundcloudpromotions.com/where-to-buy-soundcloud-followers.html

Pass-by-reference

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January 23, 2014
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emberson@faslab.com wants to see the C/C++ const concept used in Java. By this he doesn’t mean the equivalent of final (i.e., creating a constant), rather, he means he wants the ability to declare that a method will not alter a value and that the value returned will not be altered by the code which receives it. Currently in Java, final simply declares that a value is unchangeabled, whether it has a basic type or is a reference to an object. Making a reference to an object constant does not mean that its members cannot be altered, however, and this is what emberson sees as a fatal flaw. (Another trick is to make a member private and provide a public method to get the value, but this doesn’t significantly alter the way in which a reference to an object can be used, as far as this discussion is concerned.) The only way to make sure that non-final members of an object cannot be altered in a method to which you provide a reference is to give that method a reference to a clone of the object instead of to the object itself. This can introduce major performance problems, especially if deep copies are made when cloning.
bill_foote@ca.credence.com sees const as merely introducing more complexity than it’s worth, citing the extensions in C++ which were required as a consequence of its use, and giving a hair-raising code example. He doesn’t think it catches enough bugs to justify the extra complexity in user programme and compiler. He goes on to suggest a simple solution: write the “const” portion in one class, and extend that class to give a mutable version – a variation on the method proposed by ejfried below.

The Obfuscated Java Programming

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January 23, 2014
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Essentially, the aim of the contest is to show how confusing you can make your Java programme and its interaction with the world. Details about the contest are still being worked out. See the announcement for more information.
Business class

At the end of October/beginning of November, we’ll unveil Business class, a new information service aimed at the executive with an interest in Java and the web. Business class will be published monthly and will feature in-depth discussions of issues important to decision makers in all branches of commerce and industry. Planned articles include an overview of the language in terms of the benefits it can bring your company, a perspective on databases and persistence, a commentary on how Java will impact hardware acquisition, what role Java can play in your company’s training programme, and much more.
The service will be on a subscription basis, but the first issue will be free for all to examine.

Java Visual Cafe

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January 23, 2014
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Symantec seems to have impressed the Java programming crowd very well with its beta release of Visual Cafe for Windows 95/NT. Many users, including arendt@uiuc.edu and werpu@inflab.uni-linz.ac.at liked the Interaction Wizard and thought it was excellent for designing UIs. jonl@sealevelsoftware.com mentioned that he was happy to see package support – the project package viewer and the ability to open multiple packages simultaneously – within the IDE.
gscott@netcom.com posted a more thorough review of Visual Cafe and touched on setup, performance and interface. He said that downloading and installation was quick and easy, but Visual Cafe is relatively slower than Cafe on his P100 with 16MB RAM (others with more memory replied that they did not find it slow). gscott also mentioned that although the Interaction Wizard may be ‘cute’, he is more interested in writing his own code. He iterated his view by saying that Visual Cafe will be very nice for graphical programs, but for general programming Cafe seems to remain easier to use. This point was supported by Symantec folks: DSmith2@symantec.com commented that Cafe and Visual Cafe are different types of development environments…Cafe is more suited to C/C++ programmers while Visual Cafe should appeal more to Visual Basic or Delphi users (or those building graphical programs). msafai@symantec.com (manager of the Java development tools team) added that most of the functionality of Cafe is still available ‘under the hood’ of Visual Cafe. [Perhaps they could make it easier to raise the hood and make that functionality more accessible.]

Java JDK 1.1

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January 23, 2014
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JavaSoft posted a document describing the planned features in JDK 1.1. A preliminary release of the new JDK will be available in the fourth quarter of 1996, so perhaps we will have to wait until next year for the final version. Some of the additions to expect in JDK 1.1 are:
JAR files – an archive file format for applets; includes compression and digital signatures
Internationalization – greater support of UNICODE and locale-sensitive formatting
Security – a variety of security features, including cryptography, key management, digital signatures and access control
AWT Enhancements – featuring APIs for printing, scrolling, popup menus, clipboard, better support for internationalization, etc.; the Windows AWT has been completely re-written [Hopefully this is similar to Netscape's new Win32 AWT instead of adding another implementation into the pot.]

Java system news

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January 23, 2014
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Announcements

[Java venture fund] A $100 million venture capital fund has been created by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. The KPCB Java Fund is aimed at companies developing Java-related products; the first recipients of fund investments will be Active Software, Calico Technology, and Marimba.
[IBM/Sun object technology] IBM and Sun announced a deal last week to cross-license each others’ object technology products. IBM will gain use of JOE, the Java-based ORB from SunSoft. Meanwhile, Sun will acquire class libraries that link Java into IBM’s MQ Series messaging middleware and CICS, IBM’s transaction environments. In addition, IBM will port the MQ Series middleware to Solaris by next year.

Java Applet Communications

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January 23, 2014
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donpark@quake.net and mark.brady@connectcorp.com commented on the bug reported last week – that NN 3.0B6 doesn’t let you cast an applet object accessed via getApplets() to its proper type. It seems the problem is moderately complex – if you have five different “foo” applets on the same page, each has their own type! It’s not clear whether you can access instance variables in all this tangle, but you can’t access static variables. jmarsh@concept5.com stated that this would all be resolved when Java Beans is released: “Early betas in November or so.” mark.brady has found a temporary solution by Tientien Li.
jg@netscape.com says that each applet was given its own ClassLoader to address security issues in LiveConnect. They’re afraid that an applet could access JavaScript to steal text from a form on some page – not necessarily a page on which the applet is located. They hadn’t thought this communication technique was used this widely, and it caught them by surprise. They wan to fix this in time for the final release, and suggest that two applets “share a classloder iff:

Java News

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January 23, 2014
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Announcements

[Microsoft licenses VRML] Microsoft announced that it will license Liquid Reality Core, the Java-based VRML 2.0 implementation from Dimension X. Microsoft plans to use the technology to support VRML 2.0 as an ActiveX control for its Web browser. [The license is limited to the Windows 95 and Windows NT operating systems.]
[BeOS gets Java] Be, creators of the BeBox, will work with Metrowerks to port the Java VM, development tools and JIT compiler to the BeOS; they will be available in the CodeWarrior for BeBox products.
[Embedded Systems Conference] The Embedded Systems Conference, to be held September 16-19 in San Jose, CA, will include several classes on Java in embedded systems.

Disatisfaction with TextArea Java

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January 23, 2014
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Recently, there has been a fair amount of complaining about the TextArea class regarding its lack of platform-independent and lack of functionality. In particular, many programmers complained about problems with text wrapping inasmuch as it is not supported on Windows machines. atang@io.org stated that while text wrapping seems to work on Macintoshes, it is not perfect and seems to wrap only after a “certain length.” jneffenger@volano.com offered his FormattedTextArea class (see Offers) to the delight of some. However, others added that it wasn’t quite right, and didn’t scroll as fluidly as standard text wrapping editors. Others, such as shiwon@dnrc.bell-labs.com and akhavan@sdismtp.sharpwa.com, complained that there was too much functionality — in particular, they wanted a TextArea with no scrollbar, thereby accentuating the fact that the current options of TextArea and TextField may not be enough — or at least not flexible enough — to cover all scenarios.
However, the most vocal and predominant complaint was the fact that these quirks were platform-dependent, causing some to further question Java’s claims of platform-independence.

[Beans] JavaSoft have made available their Java Beans

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January 23, 2014
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Discussions

MSoft’s J++

There’s been some feedback about Microsoft’s J++ compiler, with mixed reviews. HMULLING@us.oracle.com reported some bugs:
it seems the compiler doesn’t like certain types of overloading. He found it complained about a “Redeclaration of member” when he declared two methods
String func(Object obj) { … }
String func(String str) { … }
The same happened when overloading using a single int and long parameter.
it also seems to be even more brain-dead than the JDK about detecting at compile time whether a variable has been initialised before use. [The JDK complains about variables and for-loops like int i; for(i=0; ...); j = i;. J++ would appear get uppity about if( (i=fun()) == 0 ) already.]
it may also be confused when it needs to find superclasses (though this may simply be a configuration problem)
it allows protected public in places (this is obsolete)
it’s confused about clone()
UNIX and IDE’s